CHINA TOPIX

Updated 2:12 PM EST, Wed, Jan 29, 2020

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Pro-Independence Hong Kong Citizens Use Passport Stickers to Voice Their Sentiments

Hong Kong Passport

(Photo : China Photos) Authorities in mainland China and Hong Kong are yet to officially comment on the stickers. It is unclear whether they will consider such acts as a defacement of the Hong Kong passport.

A number of pro-independent Hong Kong citizens have started placing stickers on top of their passports to hide the Communist China emblem. The idea was inspired by some Taiwanese who did the same with their passport to show their support for an independent Taiwan.

The Hongkong Free Press reported that stickers sports several designs including an image of the Lion Rock, the Hong Kong skyline, the old British coat of arms, a trader sail junk and even world famous martial artist Bruce Lee.

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San Gaai Si, the designer of the stickers, proudly told the press that many of his stickers have become bestsellers among locals and foreigners alike.

Authorities in mainland China and Hong Kong are yet to officially comment on the stickers. It is unclear whether they will consider such acts as a defacement of the Hong Kong passport.

The designer, however, said that permanent residents of Hong Kong simply need to present their identity cards to immigration officials when traveling abroad. San also added that the Hong Kong does not have any laws yet that forbid the defacing of the their passport.

Such is not the case in Taiwan. Taipei is trying to pass an amendment in its passport laws declaring the stickers that covers the Republic of China emblem as illegal.

Almost three months ago, pro-independent Taiwanese started placing stickers on top of their passports to cover the ROC emblem. The move caused controversy and debate between government officials and citizens of the island.

Two stickers are usually placed on the passport. One sticker contain the words "Republic of Taiwan", to cover the original wording Republic of China. The second sticker features a number of Taiwanese icon or landmark and use to cover the national emblem of Taiwan.

The pro-independence group posted on their Facebook page that the proposed amendment is yet to become a law. The group has denounced the government's move and said that such law will violate the right of people to express themselves which is guaranteed by the Taiwan constitution. They also accuse members of the Kuomintang party of being subservient to the will of the mainland Chinese leaders.

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