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Updated 11:29 AM EDT, Tue, Jun 16, 2020

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Amphibians Experience Additional Difficulty in Migrating to another Place

Salamander

(Photo : REUTERS/EDWARD KABAY/UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND/HANDOUT VIA REUTERS) An Eastern red-spotted newt, a North American native and a popular aquarium pet, shown in its juvenile stage, is pictured at the Jefferson National Forest in Virginia

The annual amphibian migration in Northern New England is always considered to be dangerous, however the delayed start after the long winter is considered to be an additional challenge this year.

Salamanders and frogs travel every spring to vernal pools aiming to mate and be able to lay eggs and offspring which do require numerous months to develop and to grow its legs just before summer comes and the pool dries up.

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Wildlife officials say that the migration has been a week or two behind this year and the situation is alarming for the experts.

"With a late spring and climate change predicting hotter, drier summers, we're really in a race against time before these vernal pools dry up, leaving these animals stranded to die,” said Eric Orff, wildlife biologist with the National Wildlife Federation.

New Hampshire Fish and Game wildlife biologist Mike Marchand explained that New Hampshire is a home to species that solely depends on the vernal pools. Wood frogs and other four types of salamanders are considered to be under the endangered state while the other two are known to be “of conservation concern”. All species have a special role in the ecosystem.

When temperature falls into 40s and 50s, critters does starts to move during rainy nights. Officials are now encouraging residents to do everything that they can to help the amphibians survive their trek.

On Monday at Southwestern New Hanpshire when the “Big Night” happened, considered as the season’s first significant migration. Almost hundreds of volunteers participated and took the street shuttling nearly 3,000 amphibians in crossing the road.

Harris Center for Conservation Education has been successfully training volunteers since 2007 for its “Salamander Crossing Brigades.”

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