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Updated 11:29 AM EDT, Tue, Jun 16, 2020

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Jupiter, Venus To Go On A Date? Looks Like A Match Made In Heaven!

Jupiter, Venus To Go On A Date? Looks Like A Match Made In Heaven!

(Photo : Getty Images/China Photos) Two planets are set to make a dramatic and spectacular sight on June 30. The second and the fifth planets farthest from the sun, Venus and Jupiter, are going to converge at the end of the month.

Two planets are set to make a dramatic and spectacular sight on June 30. The second and the fifth planets farthest from the sun, Venus and Jupiter, are going to converge at the end of the month.

Are you ready for a match made in heaven? At the beginning of this month, Jupiter and Venus were 20 degrees apart in the sky. Every week since winter 2014, Business Standard reported that these two planets have been moving closer to each other. And now, they are about to reach their closet point.

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According to astronomers, Jupiter and the stars behind it have gradually slipped lower in the evening twilight. Venus, on the other hand, has stayed up high because of its rapid orbital motion around the sun. The resulting slow-motion convergence, which should be visible in a clear sky through the use of sky-gazing equipment, will give a fascinating sight.

While Jupiter and Venus appear close to each other, South Wales Evening Post revealed that they're actually not. Based on the facts explained by NASA, the moon is closest to Earth, just 247,000 miles away. While Venus is 56 million miles from Earth, and Jupiter is 10 times farther out at just over 550 million miles, DNA noted.

At closest approach, Jupiter and Venus will be close enough to fit comfortably within the telescope's field view and will also be visible to the naked eye. According to In-The-Sky.org, the pair will be at an angular separation of 42 degrees from the sun, which is in the constellation Gemini at this time of year.

As these two brightest planets in the sky, the enormous gas giant Jupiter and the cloud-covered world of Venus, go on a date on June 30, sky-gazers could expect a celestial spectacle. And by July 1, The Conversation has learned that the distance between the two planets will dramatically shrink and the pair will mimic a splendid double star.

With their dazzling brightness and their steady light, Jupiter and Venus will spend eight evenings within 2 degrees from each other from June 27 through July 4. This close celestial pair-up is referred to as a "conjunction."


Meanwhile, summer is the best time to see Earth's home galaxy, the Milky Way. Aside from Jupiter and Venus' alignment, Wales Online said that there is also the "Blue Moon," which refers to the third full moon of an astronomical season with four full moons or the second full moon in a calendar month, on July 31. Also during summer, the "summer triangle" composed of three bright stars—Vega, Deneb and Altair—can also be seen in the skies.

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