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Updated 11:29 AM EDT, Tue, Jun 16, 2020

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Women With Pregnancy Complications Might Be At Higher Risk Of Heart Disease

Women With Pregnancy Complications Might Be At Higher Risk Of Heart Disease

A new study has indicated that pregnant women who experience complications may have higher risk of dying from coronary diseases.

A new study has indicated that pregnant women who experience complications may have higher risk of dying from coronary diseases.

According to Free District.com, the research study was conducted at the Public Health Institute's Child Health and Development Studies, engaging almost 15,000 pregnant women to evaluate the association between pregnancy complications and deaths due to cardiovascular diseases.

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A total of 368 of participants in the study died of cardiovascular disease, with an average age of 66. The study showed certain combinations increased the risk of heart disease death.

Pregnancy complications can be of two types: maternal and fetal. The maternal problems include symptoms such as hyperemesis gravidarum, deep vein thrombosis, pre-eclampsia, eclampsia, anemia, urinary incontinence, and postpartum depression.

The fetal problems are placental abruption, ectopic pregnancy, and multiple pregnancies such as monozygotic, dizygotic, or plyzygotic.

The study discovered that women who delivered too early were linked to sevenfold increase in the risk of cardiovascular death. Patients with gestational hypertension and pre-eclampsia along with small-for-gestational-age infant are four times more likely to die at an early age due to cardiovascular diseases.

Additionally, the researchers revealed that presence of sugar in the urine and a particular pattern of decline in hemoglobin increased the risk of death due to coronary disease.

Dr. Barbara A. Cohn, Director of the Child Health and Development Studies at the Public Health Institute.
Berkeley, California, suggested that if a woman experiences pregnancy complications so that doctor may discuss cardiovascular disease prevention at an earlier age.

"We think that it would important to find biomarkers in early pregnancy, for example in blood, that correlate both with high risk pregnancy complications and cardiovascular disease risk. These studies could identify pathways to risk and lead to opportunities to protect mothers and also their infants," shared Dr. Cohn in an interview with Medical Research.com.

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