CHINA TOPIX

Updated 11:29 AM EDT, Tue, Jun 16, 2020

Make CT Your Homepage

British Teenager Commits Suicide Due to Wi-Fi Allergies, According to Parents

Wi-Fi Electro-hypersensitivity disorder

(Photo : Reuters) A British teenager as committed suicide due to the presence of Wi-Fi in her school which triggered her Electro-hypersensitivity disorder. A WHO report issued in 2005 said that EHS and its symptoms could be a debilitating condition for those who are afflicted with this disorder. However, the report also stated that it found no evidence that exposure to Wi-Fi signals can trigger an EHS attack.

A British teenager committed suicide in June this year by hanging herself on a tree. A court hearing has recently been held to find out if her reportedly allergic reaction to Wi-Fi drove the school girl to kill herself.

The Mirror reported that the victim Jenny Fry suffers from an unusual and also controversial medical condition known Electro-hypersensitivity (EHS).

Like Us on Facebook

During the hearing, Jenny's mother Debra recounted that her daughter suffered from various symptoms including fatigue, difficulties with her bladder and splitting headaches due to the presence of Wi-Fi at her school.

On June 11, at around 4 p.m. in the afternoon, the body of the teenager was discovered hanging from a tree near the Fry's residence at Chadlington, Oxfordshire. Jenny had earlier hinted about the suicide by texting a school mate that she will be absent that day.

Jenny's parents had removed Wi-Fi connections at their house due to their daughter's medical condition which started in late 2012.

However, Jenny regularly goes to school at Chipping Norton School in Oxfordshire which is equipped with Wi-Fi. The teen's symptoms returned after being exposed to Wi-Fi signals in certain parts of the school.

Jenny would leave the classroom in order to find a space where she can concentrate on her studies without interference from the Wi-Fi signals. But the school punished her for that by giving her detentions.

The parents confronted the school and showed the information they collected regarding EHS to the school head, Simon Duff. However, the school dismissed their claims.

Debra also told the court that she frequently debated with Jenny's teachers about allowing her daughter to continue her studies in a room that is free from the signals of Wi-Fi.

She believes that her daughter would have been alive today if the school authorities had been more flexible.

A WHO report issued in 2005 said that EHS and its symptoms could be a debilitating condition for those who are afflicted with this disorder. However, the report also stated that it found no evidence that exposure to Wi-Fi signals can trigger an EHS attack.

Real Time Analytics